Let your users wait…

  
A good article by Tal Mishali on UX MAG about wait time: communicating progress in UI Design.

When an action we perform happens faster than we would expect it to, we may not appreciate the effort put into it. In more extreme cases we may think that if it happened too fast, maybe it didn’t happen at all.

Full article here: http://uxmag.com/articles/let-your-users-wait

I always find interesting to design aspects of software where it is necessary to communicate progress and provide feedback when the action is accomplished. This is a typical application of ‘microinteractions’, where small design details like a well design progress indicator can provide surprise and delight.
Well designed microinteractions can go a long way in making your service stand out from your competitors.

The Mistery Meat of Mobile Navigation

I wouldn’t know what to choose from: Hamburger or Kebab for your mobile navigation?

Jokes aside, it is sad to see the hamburger and its poor cousin the kebab are frequently used not only for mobile, but even in desktop and tablet layouts. It’s a lazy design choice and it does not make your website easier to use, rather the opposite. Evidence suggest that a ‘menu’ button is 20% more clicked than a hamburger button. On tablet, there is often space for standard top navigation.

Do Androids dream in Verse?


a great article from Joscelin Cooper, former UX Writer at Google :

As technology becomes more pervasive and gains access to greater amounts of our personal data, how can we design successful human-machine conversations? Should user interface text approximate the lilt, flow, and syntax of human speech? Or does humanizing UI conversations create a false intimacy that distances even as it attempts to foster familiarity?

The answer, of course, is that it depends. Most of us have encountered voice-automated customer service systems. Some of them, in an effort to make their robot customer reps less droid-like, feature voices that try to approximate human diction. A calm, often female voice pauses, suggests brightly, bridges her prompts with almost-ums. Her attempts at realness further underscore the fact that she is fake, blocking you from an actual human encounter.

A computer that cheerfully calls you by your first name can either delight you or creep you out, depending on the circumstances. Just as robots enter the uncanny valley when they seem too human, a user interface that’s too familiar can push people away. The copy needs to strike the right balance.

Read the remainder of the article on A List Apart